Horizon / VOIS Architects

Sep. 24th, 2017 02:00 am
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Posted by Daniel Tapia

© Erieta Attali © Erieta Attali
  • Architects: VOIS Architects
  • Location: Paros, Greece
  • Design Team: Sinanioti Fania , Vordoni Katerina, Georgiou-Richter Martha
  • Area: 260.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Erieta Attali, Athina Souli
  • Landscape Architect: ECOSCAPES
  • Construction: Doriki Techniki
  • Light Design: HALO
  • Bathroom Fittings: Dornbracht
  • Casings: Panorama
  • Hardware: Pien boon for formani
  • Ceiling Fan: Boffi
© Athina Souli © Athina Souli

From the architect. The summer house was designed by VOIS architects in 2012. The name, “H_orizon”, derives from the two basic elements of the design. “H” constitutes the configuration of the building that resembles the shape of the letter, where the main volumes expand symmetrically along the axis SW - SE. “Orizon”, from the aim of the design and the need for the house to remain in continuous connection to the open “orizon”.

Elevations Elevations
© Erieta Attali © Erieta Attali

Through the void, created between the two main volumes, a frame is created that captures the perpetual energy and alternating images of the sea horizon. This element remains as a focal point of the house that concentrates on daily family activity and movements of the natural scenery. At the same time it is the point from which the viewpoints begin and extend.

© Athina Souli © Athina Souli

The house emerges from the landscape and the landscape evolves linearly as an extension of the house. The entrance to the house happens through an extended pathway that is surrounded by an inclined plane. The gradual walk leads the visitor towards the main living area.

© Athina Souli © Athina Souli

The seating area is created on a recessed level in order to allow for unobscured views. The bedrooms and supporting areas are situated in a balanced manner on each side of the main axis. The pool situated in front of the living area follows the linear direction towards the horizon emerging the blue surfaces of the water.

© Athina Souli © Athina Souli

The Exchange / Oyler Wu Collaborative

Sep. 23rd, 2017 08:00 pm
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Posted by Rayen Sagredo

Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative
  • Architects: Oyler Wu Collaborative
  • Location: Columbus, IN, United States
  • Design Team: Oyler Wu Collaborative: Dwayne Oyler, Jenny Wu, Hans Koesters, Lung Chi Chang, Harrison Steinbuch, Irvin Shaifa, Clint Johnson, Andy Magner, Dongwoo Suk, Andrea Sanchez, Hsiyuan Pan, Thomas Lanham, Emilijia Landsbergis, Suhan Na, Ibrahim Ibrahim, Tucker van Leuwen-Hall
  • Engineering: Nous Engineering, Matthew Melnyk, Katahdin Engineering LLC, Elizabeth Woolf
  • Project Year: 2017
Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative
Plan Plan

From the architect. The Exchange sits within the plaza adjacent to the Irwin Conference Center by Eero Saarinen (formerly the Irwin Union Bank) and makes use of the three existing canopies that formerly served the drive-through bank tellers. The design challenge was to “activate” the space while relating a contemporary design concept to the historic building and existing site conditions.  

Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative
Isometric Isometric

Oyler Wu's research into Eero Saarinen's oeuvre, along with analysis of the site, led to a focus on three keys concepts: the unification of the existing canopies into a rectangular volume, solid/void relationships that include a "loose fit" placement of solid elements within carved voids throughout the scheme, and the use of contrasting tectonic strategies of solid and frame. The intention of this strategy is to produce the sense that the pavilion is simultaneously brand new and that it has always been there.

Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative

The pavilion defines a new public space on the site by completing the geometries implied by the three canopies, legacies of Irwin Conference Center’s history as a drive-up bank.   The pavilion provides a range of porosities, from semi-private spaces to open areas defined only by the nuanced spatial containment of the implied volume.  The pavilion is composed of a complex mixture of volumetric walls and systems  of intricate framework that wind its way through the volume.   It is further enlivened by a sophisticated tectonic interplay of embedded objects derived from Oyler Wu’s particular interest in line/volume relationships. The resulting complex of overhead elements, walls, and benches produce new areas of containment and new points of destination.

Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative
Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative Courtesy of Oyler Wu Collaborative

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Posted by Bridget Cogley

Puerta Lomas House by Santoscreativos

Rows of columns surround flexible spaces on the ground floor of this house in Guadalajara by Mexican firm Santoscreatives, and support boxy volumes above. Read more

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Posted by Piedad Rojas

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

Architect Alfredo Thiermann has recently collaborated withChileanmed chilean Filmmaker Marialy Rivas in her latest film “Princesita." The film will be premiered next week at the Toronto International Film Festival. 

Alfredo Thiermann’s practice has been long involved in the interaction of architecture with other medias (Artifact Nr. I  Dynamics of the Void Noise Tower ) and here is the result of his last collaboration with “Fabula Productions," also known for Pablo Larrain’s academy- nominee ”No” and Sebastian Lelio’s “Gloria."

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

Architect: Alfredo Thiermann Riesco
Location: Lago Llanquihue, Chile
Client: Fabula Productions
Director: Marialy Rivas
Program: Film Set
Project Year: 2016
Construction Year: 2017
Built Area: 80 m2

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

From the architects: House I is a hybrid between a permanent illusion and a limited existence; between a monolithic —and at the same time heavy— appearance and a semi-translucent interior. 

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

House I was designed to be seen more than to be used. To be seen and multiple time registered by a film camera with anamorphic lenses. Unlike other houses, in its interior, events were precisely designed with a limited temporal duration. 

House I has one single profile made out of one continuous —and over structured— element which defines walls and roof. This single element is repeated more times than what is strictly necessary, making the camera believe that there is more depth than what it exists in reality. 

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco
Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

From the exterior, the house is meant to be seen only from afar. It appears in the landscape as an opaque and monolithic object —with uncanny typological similitudes with the construction that normally surround the area. However, the excessive symmetry places the doubt in the aforementioned similarities.

Imágenes de la película. Image Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Imágenes de la película. Image Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

Seen from the interior, the house looks lighter than any other house. The wooden cladding allows natural light to go through, but not a single glance. What happens in the interior has to remain a secret, that was the only requirement of the brief.

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

After a few days, House I was intentionally burned while it was seen carefully from afar.

Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco Cortesía de Alfredo Thiermann Riesco

From the director:

In a distant land on the southernmost tip of the world lives Tamara, a twelve-year-old girl who has been raised in a cult led by the charismatic Miguel. As she becomes a young woman, she receives instructions for her mission in life: to carry a holy child, fathered by Miguel himself. In this dark fairytale, Tamara will realize that what she wants for her life is not what Miguel has chosen for her, and her disobedience will have consequences she could never have imagined as she desperately tries to gain her freedom.

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Posted by Tessa Forde

From a pool of over fifty submissions, Resilient by Design have chosen ten winning teams to collaborate with engineers, climate change experts, designers, architects and community members to imagine a better future for The Bay Area in the face of potentially devastating climate change. The winning teams AECOM, BIG, Bionic, TLS, Field Operations, HASSELL, Mithun, Base Landscape, SCAPE and Gensler will spend the next year on a combination of collaborative research projects and site-specific conceptual design solutions.

Resilient by Design is an initiative that seeks to develop preventative strategies for climate events and pro-actively execute ideas that will improve the resilience of the Bay Area and benefit local communities. The idea is to formulate a “blueprint for resilience” that can be replicated and utilized locally and globally. The outcomes should be implementable, sustainable and beneficial in both the short and long term. There is a strong focus on community involvement and the importance of giving weight to the voices of those most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Other urban challenges will also be addressed, including housing, transport, health and economic disparity as a means of not just protecting the current regions, but strengthening them.

Each winning team has produced a video to explore and explain their research and concept. The ideas are dynamic, smart and capitalize on the innovative nature of The Bay Area. This will be a project to watch over the coming year as the teams collaborate globally to develop their schemes and work together to give a voice to the community and give shape to resilience.

HASSELL- HASSELL +

HASSELL with MVRDV are invested in the social potential of the waterfront.

SCAPE - Public Sediment

SCAPE aims to design with and for the use of sediment and its crucial role in the sustainability and longevity of the Bay Area's coastlines.

AECOM - The All Bay Collective

The All Bay Collective brings together a diverse selection of experienced professionals with a focus on education and outreach programs to create a legacy of qualified students, who understand what it means to be resilient.

Bionic - Bionic Team

Bionic is using this opportunity to address the housing crisis in the Bay Area through a housing scheme that will address economic disparity and fund the coastal adaptation.

Base Landscape - Permaculture + Social Equity (P+SET)

Base Landscape places emphasis on placemaking and providing skills to vulnerable communities to emphasize egalitarian ownership of a project.

Gensler - Team Uplift

Gensler plans to use the prominence of water in the bay as an asset rather than a threat and a catalyst for resilient design.

BIG - BIG + ONE + Sherwood

Bjarke Ingels Group, One Architecture + Urbanism, and Sherwood Design Engineers focus on the idea of context, with the aim of learning from other major cities and areas - New York, New Orleans and The Netherlands and synthesizing these ideas through social infrastructure.

View video here.

Field Operations - The Field Operations Team

Field Operations main focus will be resilient systems at the edges - between the city and the water.

View video here.

Mithun - The Home Team

Mithun will explore the idea of "home," shared values, people-powered place-making, and re-mapping boundaries.

View video here.

TLS Landscape Architecture - Common Ground

TLS aims to negotiate the predicted sea level rises and potential seismic activity through an investigation of the Bay Area's shorelines.

View video here.

News Via: Resilient by Design.

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Posted by Daniel Tapia

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi
  • Architects: Laboratory of Architecture #3
  • Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Lead Architects: Kakha Maisuradze, Lasha barblishvili, Shota Saganelidze, Tinatin Peikrishvili, Guram Mamisashvili, Tamar Tekhova, Elene Papiashvili, Elisabed Khundadze, Irakli Abashidze, Dimitri Shapakidze
  • Area: 2500.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Nakanimamasakhlisi
  • Structural Engineer: Cubicon
  • Aquarium Consultant: HI solutions
  • Client: GD development
© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi

From the architect. The diversity and contrasts which are offered by the physical and psychological context of the building site provoked a certain conceptual objective which goes through every part of the exterior and interior design composition. The aim was to sustain a quantum quality of being here and there at the same time, holding the design at the degree when opposite meanings blend into a single matter.

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi
Floor Type Plan 2 Floor Type Plan 2

Though the layout and the volumes of the Building were intentionally chopped, to achieve a human scale, it still has the large scale elements like a dynamic shape of a portico or a monolithic surface on the facade of a tower which provides a certain feeling of monumentality.

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi

The urban role of the architecture was to serve as a visual bridge or a geometric modulation from the neighboring group of high office buildings to the low rhythm of historical housing, standing on the other flank. The building is shaped also to integrate the group of cypress trees the architecture attempts to embrace and honor the vegetation by serving as a giant planter for them. Name of the hotel is derived from that small grove of trees. The building features a specially fabricated perforated fiber concrete curved panels on the facade.

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi

The interior of the rooms - is a fresh modernist surrounding, where most of the furniture and objects are fitted to the walls like in a yacht. Interiors are left without any objects of art or any other visually descriptive or figurative image. Idea is to put the guest as a human being with his possible activities in the center of the world around him. The composition of the inner space is never full without a guest living/acting in it.

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi

The hotel features rooms with spatial and planar experimentations to deliver a unique esthetic experience as being in one of the most unusual and strange possible places. an example is a room which originates from a historical Alcova, more a boudoir like central bed surrounded with a walk able paths not like a conventional hotel suite Purified minimalistic look of the room is disturbed by large screens with from the films projected in front of the bed. Yielding three different colors to the corridors is an attempt of experiment with shifting the genres from modernity to surreal.

© Nakanimamasakhlisi © Nakanimamasakhlisi

The restaurant is presented as a kind of cocktail with disconnected esthetic motifs similar to the striking flashes of memories that appear after a great party. Play of colorful shades projected from the bottles lighted from behind the fabric wall are presented in the lounge area. the bar is coated with automobile wrapping foil so that the glossy copper surfaces are deep and vibrant.

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Posted by Lindsey Leardi

Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

North America’s largest classical repertory theatre company, the Stratford Festival revealed Hariri Pontarini Architects’ design for their new Tom Patterson Theatre at a town hall meeting last month. According to Antoni Cimolino, the Stratford Festival’s Artistic Director, the company desires a new facility that compares to distinguished theatres worldwide. 

The Chair of the Festival’s Board of Governors and head of the architectural selection committee, Dan Bernstein said, “We approached dozens of firms from around the world, but the work of Canada’s own Siamak Hariri stood out and was the Board’s unanimous choice.”

Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

Located along the Avon River, HPA’s design plans to cover the entire site in an elaborate and colorful garden. Renderings show the garden as a terraced landscape with purple flowers, golden trees, and long grasses. In addition to creating a backdrop for the theatre, the garden will attract people in and through the site.

Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects
Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

Nestled in the garden and embraced by a dynamic bronze curtain, the curvilinear design will reflect warm light and appear to dance in the wind. The building’s organic design will generate unique interior spaces for programmatic elements, such as the lobby, café, and Forum while maintaining design continuity.

Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

When it is time for a performance to begin, guests will make their way to the lime-washed masonry brick center of the building to the theatre itself. The theatre will feature an elongated stage in between tiered seating, to provide clear sight lines and a feeling of closeness. Atmosphere hangs from the vaulted ceiling in the form of acoustics and lighting. Amid dark wooden ceiling planks, acoustic treatment and air slots will be at work during each performance. Lighting and rigging flexibility will be made possible by the ceiling’s hanging, ‘chandelier’ and bridge system.

Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

We are honored to be working so closely with Artistic Director Antoni Cimolino, Executive Director Anita Gaffney, and the Stratford team, and join them in aspiring to design a theatre unlike any other, embodying creativity and encouraging engagement and imagination. We aim to turn what is beloved within the theatre outward, reflecting the joy and spontaneity of the Stratford Festival in architectural form, said HPA founder, Siamak Hariri.

Construction is expected to start after the 2017 festival season. 

Learn more about the project here.

News via: v2com.

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Posted by Daniel Tapia

© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou
  • Architects: 2b architectes
  • Location: Épalinges, Switzerland
  • Lead Architects: Stephanie Bender, Philippe Béboux
  • Design Team: 2b architectes - B.Adam, P.Krecl, C.Alves, F.Köhli, C.Vuurmans, S.Genzoni, Ph.Herkommer, Q.Rosset, R.Pache
  • Area: 1487.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Matthieu Gafsou
  • Architects: 2b architectes
  • Location: Épalinges, Switzerland
  • Lead Architects: Stephanie Bender, Philippe Béboux
  • Design Team: 2b architectes - B.Adam, P.Krecl, C.Alves, F.Köhli, C.Vuurmans, S.Genzoni, Ph.Herkommer, Q.Rosset, R.Pache
  • Construction Management: A.planir, Echallens
  • Wood Engineer: Pirmin Jung, Rain
  • Structural Engineer: 3demArch, Crissier
  • Building Physicist: Pirmin Jung, Rain
  • Acoustic Engineer: Pirmin Jung, Rain
  • Engineer Hvpe: Amstein+Walthert, Lausanne
  • Area: 1487.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Matthieu Gafsou
© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

From the architect. The University Care and Rehabilitation Centre Sylvana (CUTR) occupies a former sanatorium built in 1913 in Epalinges, a municipality situated above the City of Lausanne, on an exceptional site at the edge of the woods overlooking the entire Lake Geneva region.


© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

To satisfy the growing demand for post-hospital rehabilitation beds, the roof optimization created space for two floors for beds and care programs by replacing the attic and roof-tree of the 1950s. Technical and size-related constraints were integrated into an organic form that makes use of roof ridges and surfaces, thus reinterpreting the shape of the former sanatorium by seeking to make it blend in with the nearby treeline.

Chronologic Scheme Chronologic Scheme
South Elevation South Elevation

This strong aspiration to integration resulted in the choice of copper-coated bituminous roofing membranes, which would ultimately take on the hues of the surrounding treescape. The new roof construction was prefabricated and largely made of wood, allowing for a limitation of additional load, while thanks to the speed of the realization, the construction deadline could be adhered to without any interruption of hospital operations.
29 rehabilitation beds in 19 rooms distributed on the two newly added floors increased the number of beds at CUTR Sylvana to 95.

© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

Besides these new beds, rooms were created for various care programs and facilities for ergotherapy and physiotherapy, as well as for the hospital staff, doctors, and nurses, who run this competence and care center for geriatric rehabilitation.
In analogy with the room organization principle of the lower floors, the various programs of the two newly added floors are clustered around a generously proportioned communal room, which was conceived of as a kind of indoor street where people can simply stroll around or engage in rehabilitation activities and exercise.

© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

This room is a meeting place for patients and personnel and provides a high-quality point of reference as an alternative to the classic corridor/room division. Its form automatically resulted from the organization of the variously dimensioned rooms and the arrangement of the different rooms and other facilities, which is reflected in a rich and varied spatiality. On the topmost floor, this area is even more spacious thanks to the flow and specific shape of the roof.

© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou
Floors Plans Floors Plans
© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

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Posted by Tessa Forde

Courtesy of Michel Kozman Courtesy of Michel Kozman

Michel Kozman has imagined a light-filled library for Hyde Park as part of the Archasm Hyde Park Library Competition that ran earlier this year. The competition, which attracted 378 registrations, called for “a stimulating and exciting approach towards the design of a library at Hyde Park.” The brief requested consideration be given to modern forms of media, including audiovisual and digital technologies, challenge the traditional library typology and become a zone within the park for knowledge exchange and gathering.

Courtesy of Michel Kozman Courtesy of Michel Kozman
Section Section

Kozman’s design entry was drawn from the park, for the park. Located on the lake edge, the building attempts to solidify the moment where water is disturbed and ripples outwards, resulting in a kind of rolling, droplet-shaped object. The form is then pulled, so it is leaning over its entrance. This formal condition is extended into the landscape, with an outdoor amphitheater curling up from the ground like a lip.

Courtesy of Michel Kozman Courtesy of Michel Kozman

The building’s skin would appear woven and the space frame construction left exposed, creating a dappled, patterned light, denser where the heat gain is less desired and responding to its leafy context.

The library sinks inwards over four floors to an internal courtyard, and stainless steel panels are used internally to capitalize on reflections of the park surrounding. This would create an immersive experience, bringing the outside in and the inside out. The columns holding up the structure fluctuate in width and twist like tree trunks while the floor plates wave around the edges to create double-height alcoves below.

This dynamic scheme would be an interesting addition to London’s largest royal park. It is a unique design, full of light and air and would no doubt offer a place of respite on the city’s colder days.

New via: Michel Kozman.

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Posted by Samantha Buckley

via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

The targeted maximum wait time in office building elevators is 20 seconds—it just feels like 2 minutes when you’re in a rush. But how quickly are the elevators actually moving?

The fastest installed elevator reaches speeds of 67 feet per second (20.5 meters per second), or 46 miles per hour (73.8 kilometers per hour) in the Shanghai Tower. Not only does the Gensler-designed Shanghai Tower boast the fastest elevator, but also the longest continuous run of 1,898 feet of the 2,073-foot tower (578.5 of 632 meters), as revealed in a recent study by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). At these speeds, you can reach the 119th floor in 55 seconds.

Runners-up in the fastest elevator race are the CTF Finance Center, at a speed of 65 feet per second (20 meters per second) and Taipei 101, reaching a peak speed of at 55 feet per second (16.8 meters per second). Rounding out the top 5 are the Landmark Tower in Yokohama, accelerating to 41 feet per second (12.5 meters per second) and Two International Finance Center designed by Cesar Pelli at 35 feet per second (10.6 meters per second).

Surprisingly, only two of the fastest elevators top the charts for the tallest continuous elevator runs. As mentioned, the Shanghai Tower has the longest run, while the CTF Finance center has the third-longest run, covering 1,695 feet of the 1,739-foot tower (516.7 of 530 meters). The Ping An Finance Center by KPF boasts the second-longest elevator run at 1,881 feet of the 1,965-foot tall tower (573.5 of 599 meters). The Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building designed by SOM, has a continuous elevator run of 1,653 feet (504 meters), reaching only sixty percent of the building’s 2,723-foot (830-meter) height. Last on CTBUH's “World’s Five Tallest Continuous Elevator Runs” report is the 1,821-foot (555-meter)-tall Lotte World Tower in Seoul, with a 1,627-foot (496-meter) continuous elevator run taking one minute to ride from bottom to top.

And because what goes up, must come down, the world’s deepest elevator also receives a mention in the CTBUH report, descending 1,148 feet (350 meters) at the KONE elevator testing facility in Tytyri, Finland. To see all the numbers behind the world's fastest and tallest elevators, check out the report at CTBUH.

via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
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Posted by Alyn Griffiths

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects

Chinese studio Dot Architects has completed a futuristic home in a traditional Beijing hutong, featuring moveable furniture modules and an extension constructed using the WikiHouse open-source architecture platform. Read more

23 — 24 сентября

Sep. 23rd, 2017 12:01 pm
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Posted by 1351929

23 — 24 сентября

Все самое интересное из происходящего в городе в эти выходные: фестивали, ярмарки, вечеринки и многое другое в нашей трансляции

Читать дальше...

IKC de Geluksvogel / UArchitects

Sep. 23rd, 2017 05:00 am
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Posted by Rayen Sagredo

East side. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects East side. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects
  • Contractor: BMV
  • Consultant: ZRi
  • Construction Consultant: Castermans
  • Hvac Consultant: K+ adviesgroep
  • Environment Consultant: CNME
East side playground. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects East side playground. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects

From the architect. This a unique sustainable and digital school in the Netherlands.

Two existing schools in two neighbouring locations in Maastricht are merging into a new school on a new location in that city. This particular location was chosen to strengthen the weak social structure of the two neighbourhoods and to introduce a new digital education system to learn also more about the environment, nature and sustainability.

Ground floor plan Ground floor plan

Even the playground outside has different zones to help children (re)discover nature and explore their world by means of experiments or to build and test objects.

South side. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects South side. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects

The digital way of teaching is for the most part paperless (virtual), which is represented in the architecture of the building. It shows a brick element with random messages in binary code (1 and 0) on the façade, as a reflection of this digitalized education system and the virtual reality in which we live today. The façade acts as the messenger of our digital world. Not in a direct, obvious way but more indirect, by the irregular placing of the bricks in patterns.

Ground floor plan Ground floor plan
Sections Sections
East side playground. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects East side playground. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects

This is a school that holds a kindergarten, a primary school, a gym and a library. A school with different types of users that work closely together to combine environmental and digital teaching to reach a new level of education. The concept of environmental teaching can be found on different levels, from virtual reality to the building itself, making it the green and modern digital school.

Ground floor open classes. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects Ground floor open classes. Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects

Both the school and the building are not designed around a classically organized educational system but around the concept of free movement and free use of spaces. We used the concept of a flock of birds to predict the movement of the users (children) through the building, which is how we designed the various spaces in the school. The educational space in the school is not limited to the classrooms but can continue in different open spaces with a different purpose. This open plan will encourage the free flow between and use of the spaces; education will not be limited by walls or doors. It even continues outside to the playground and the terraces on the first floor.

mainstair ground floor . Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects mainstair ground floor . Image © Daan Dijkmeijer and UArchitects

Oscillation / Atelier Vecteur

Sep. 23rd, 2017 02:00 am
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Posted by Sabrina Leiva

© Tim Fox © Tim Fox
  • Architects: Atelier Vecteur
  • Location: Nantes, France
  • Architect In Charge: Thomas Dalby / Ugo Elzière/ Coline Giardi
  • Area: 80.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Tim Fox
© Tim Fox © Tim Fox

From the architect. The installation as been realized to protect a construction site and be part of the Festival Voyage à Nantes in France. It as been made from only one and similar same section of Wood. From the same section, we made floor, wall, ceiling and chairs. This is a temporay construction which is going to last for 2 years, till the construction site behind is finished.

© Tim Fox © Tim Fox

 A succession of wooden frames guides the visitor throughout a singular journey.It offers to the passer-by as to the festival of the points of views.This tunnel subtracts its user, time its crossing the city to transform into spectator.The installation plays with light.It responds to the street and brings the street full of voids, shadows and lights.

© Tim Fox © Tim Fox

The smell of wood invites the course and participates in the rupture of the city. The succession of wooden frames is punctuated like the malleable bellows of the accordion. The frames lead us through a sensory experience.

The journey carries the visitor along the route. The journey is not straight, it is winding, filled with surprises and pitfalls. The wooden installation attracts the passer-by to enter and leave on a trip. The journey carries the visitor along the route. 

Sections Sections
© Tim Fox © Tim Fox

The vegetation grab on the structure and create a peaceful atmosphere.  The course is adapted to the street. It changes as the path progresses.

© Tim Fox © Tim Fox
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